Taking the SAT with Accommodations

Before taking the SAT with accommodations, students with documented disabilities must get approval from College Board’s Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD).

Test Centers

Most students—including those testing with accommodations—take the SAT at test centers. These are some accommodations that may be provided at a test center:

  • Time and one-half (+50%)
  • 14-point test booklet
  • Large-print (large-block) answer sheet (no bubbles)
  • Extra breaks

School-Based Testing

Students approved for school-based accommodations usually test at the school they attend. Students who do not attend a school should contact SSD to arrange for a test date and location. These are some accommodations that may be provided only at the student's school:

  • Double time (+100%)
  • Human reader
  • Scribe
  • Pre-recorded audio (MP3 via streaming)

Before Test Day

Families should check with the school's SSD coordinator to make sure accommodations are in place and no further documentation is required—especially if the student was approved at another school or the family did not go through the school to request accommodations. If a student is approved for school-based accommodations, it is important to notify the SSD coordinator of the dates that you intend to test.

On Test Day

On test day, all students testing with accommodations should remember to bring their SSD eligibility letter.

What to Know About Extended Time

Students approved for extended time who register for the SAT must stay for the entire amount of time for which they’re approved, even if they stop work before time is called. They may not move onto the next section or subject until the allotted time has passed. The unscored section is eliminated for extended time test takers.

  • Students approved for extended time in reading will receive extended time for the entire test because all test sections require some reading.
  • Students approved for extended time in math only will receive extended time only for the Math Test.
  • Extended time in written expression, Speaking and Listening, does not apply to the SAT.

For time and one-half (+50%), the SAT is 4 hours and 30 minutes of testing time, plus breaks:

  • 98 minutes for the Reading Test
  • 53 minutes for the Writing and Language Test
  • 38 minutes for the Math Test – No Calculator
  • 83 minutes for the Math Test – Calculator

For double-time (+100%), the SAT is 6 hours of testing time, plus breaks:

  • 130 minutes for the Reading Test
  • 70 minutes for the Writing and Language Test
  • 50 minutes for the Math Test – No Calculator
  • 110 minutes for the Math Test – Calculator
  • All students who take the SAT with double time (+100%) are tested at their school over two days.

Approval for Extended Time May Include Extra Breaks

When taking the SAT, students approved to test with extended time will also be provided extra breaks when extended time is used.

What to Know About Breaks

All students who take the SAT under standard testing conditions are provided breaks. Snacks may be consumed during breaks, but only students approved for a food, drink, or medication accommodation are allowed to eat in the testing room.

Some students with disabilities are approved for additional break time. Break time does not count toward testing time—the clock stops.

Below are details on extra and extended breaks accommodations for the SAT:

  • Extra Breaks: Students are provided five 5-minute breaks.
  • Extended Breaks: Students are provided one 20-minute break and one 10-minute break. They break at the same points as test takers without disabilities.
  • Breaks as needed: Students may break at any time during the exam for as long as needed—within reason.

FAQs

If I’ve had accommodations approved for a prior College Board test, do I still have to make an accommodations request for the SAT?

Probably not—as long as you are asking for the same accommodations. However, you should always check with your school’s SSD coordinator well before the application deadline. Also, if you plan on requesting different accommodations, you will need to reapply.

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